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Solo Schools Wilderness First Aid Class

Wilderness First Aid Course Offered

Solo Schools Wilderness First Aid ClassHave you ever worried about what to do when emergency care is far away? The Tutorial Center at Smokey House is pleased to be sponsoring two Wilderness First Aid courses.  The first one takes place on Feb 27 and 28, is aimed specifically at high school students. The second course, on March 1 and 2, is open to young people and adults of all ages.

This two-day, introductory course provides knowledge and hands-on practice in prevention, recognition, and treatment of backcountry injuries and illnesses. Taught by SOLO instructors, WFA certification is provided upon completion of the course.

This is course is a must for teachers, group leaders, coaches, and outdoor enthusiasts as well as for student athletes and leaders. Students benefit, along with the practical skills, from the academic connections to biology and anatomy, health, and PE. The course develops skills in leadership, problem solving, and self-­‐confidence, and it’s a great resume builder.

Wilderness First Aid (WFA) course at The Tutorial Center at Smokey House is a two-day, sixteen-hour introductory course that provides knowledge and hands-on practice in prevention, recognition, and treatment of backcountry injuries and illnesses. Taught by SOLO instructors, WFA certification is provided upon completion of the course.

When:
Thurs. Feb. 27 & Fri. Feb. 28 – 9:30-5:30
(Note: The Thu.Fri. class is aimed at high school students and young adults. Limited space available.)
Sat. Mar. 1 & Sun. Mar. 2 – 8:30-4:30

Where:
The Tutorial Center at Smokey House Center
426 Danby Mountain Road, Danby, VT 05739

Cost: $195 – including course tuition, WFA book, snacks and lunch

For information and registration: Contact Juanita Burch-Clay using this convenient form:
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Building Survival Shelters

Reports on  Jan. 8 shelter building at YouthWork&Learn at Smokey House:

Robin Chesnut-Tangerman (instructor):  With the onset of real winter weather we are spending time learning about winter survival and wilderness first aid. We had talked about emergency shelters recently, and the important aspects to consider when planning them. Today we put it into practice – we bundled up warmly and headed into the woods where we split into two teams. Each team selected a site and had about an hour to design and build an emergency shelter. The hardest part for me as a teacher was NOT building or making suggestions!

IMG_7677The students did a great job and came up with very different designs and final results.  We decided not to cover the shelters with pine and hemlock boughs, which we would have done in a real emergency. Since it was not the real deal we didn’t tear the branches off living trees. One of the most reassuring things was that although it was only about 10 degrees, no one got cold until the very end when we stopped moving and conducted peer reviews of the structures.

Kieghan:   Today we learned what it is like to be stuck out in the wilderness and how we can make shelters. A friend and I made this cool looking shelter. It took us about an hour to build and it can fit up to two people in it at a time. It is made entirely out of sticks and all natural resources. I think it’s the best one I have ever constructed out of sticks.

IMG_7689Dillon:  In my group, we used a large rock and put sticks around it. In the middle, we used more taller sticks and on the side, we used smaller sized sticks. We also tried to put sticks outwards on one side to keep warmth in. The shelter is able to fit about 2 people in it. While I was it in, it was quite warm. The other group had sticks facing upward and sticks supporting the shelter. They also had green pine sticks inside as well. In the groups, we went to see the other group’s and had to make a comment on something you liked and a question or suggestion. My question was why was it built so close to a stream? The group had an interesting answer. Today was an interesting day.